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Turn over a new leaf... HEALTHFUL HABITS TO LOSE WEIGHT THIS FALL

Turn over a new leaf... HEALTHFUL HABITS TO LOSE WEIGHT THIS FALL

The cooler weather of the fall season is more than just a great time to enjoy being outdoors before cold weather sets in. For many of the 65 percent of overweight Americans, the changing season is an opportunity to establish good eating habits and increase physical activity before the stresses and temptations of the holidays arrive.

Being overweight is about more than how you wear the latest fall fashions; it's about being healthy, which is why the American Council for Fitness and Nutrition (ACFN) is encouraging Americans to regard the seasonal shift as an opportunity to embrace new habits for a lifetime of wellbeing.

Obesity is driven by complex economic, cultural, social and genetic factors. Just as there is no single cause of obesity, there is no one-size-fits-all answer. However, bringing your weight under control can begin with a single, yet important step -- matching your food intake with your physical activity level. This is known as energy balance. "Those who achieve energy balance by burning off the calories they consume are more likely to maintain a healthy weight throughout the busy fall and winter holiday seasons," says Susan Finn, Ph.D., R.D., chair of ACFN.

Of course, even when we have good intentions to watch what we eat and stay active, real life can get in the way. Demanding schedules mean meals on the run, not around the table. Environmental or emotional triggers like stress or boredom can lead to overeating. Then we find refuge in front of the TV or computer rather than taking a walk or enjoying another calorie burning activity.

ACFN offers the following pointers to help Americans embrace the opportunity for better health this fall.

"We all shift our routines in some manner when the seasons change -- the beginning of school, cooler weather and even new pastimes like watching fall sports affect our daily lives," continued Finn. "Seize this opportunity to turn over a new leaf and shed unhealthy habits -- and pounds -- this fall."

Courtesy Of ARA Content

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